RIP SSG Ron Shurer, MOH

 
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RIP SSG Ron Shurer, MOH

We've lost another Medal of Honor recipient, this time a younger one:

After a yearslong battle against lung cancer, Medal of Honor recipient and former Army Staff Sgt. Ronald J. Shurer II has died, the Secret Service announced Thursday. He was 41.

Shurer joined the military in the wake of 9/11, when he felt called to serve, according to a U.S. Army biography. The Army Special Forces medic began his military career at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, before seeking out his green beret.

“We are heartbroken by the passing of one of our own, SSG Ron Shurer II,” the 3rd Special Forces Group of Fort Bragg said. “Ron was the embodiment of the SF soldier, a dedicated husband, and a loving father. His heroic actions were an inspiration to us all. Our thoughts are, and always will be, with his family.”

He was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2017. One year later, Shurer was recognized with the Medal of Honor -- the highest military honor available — for braving incoming fire to treat and ultimately save the lives of several fellow soldiers who had been injured during an intense firefight in Afghanistan during a 2008 deployment, ABC News reported.

First his award, then the video the Army made.

Staff Sergeant Ronald J. Shurer II distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty on April 6, 2008, while serving as a Senior Medical Sergeant, Special Forces Operational Detachment Alpha 3336, Special Operations Task Force-33, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Staff Sergeant Shurer was part of an assault element inserted by helicopter into a location in Afghanistan. As the assault element moved up a near vertical mountain toward its objective, it was engaged by fierce enemy machine gun, sniper, and rocket-propelled grenade fire. The lead portion of the assault element, which included the ground commander, sustained several casualties and became pinned down on the mountainside. Staff Sergeant Shurer and the rest of the trailing portion of the assault element were likewise engaged by enemy machine gun, sniper, and rocket-propelled grenade fire. As the attack intensified, Staff Sergeant Shurer braved enemy fire to move to an injured Soldier and treat his wounds. Having stabilized the injured Soldier, Staff Sergeant Shurer then learned of the casualties among the lead element. Staff Sergeant Shurer fought his way up the mountainside, under intense enemy fire, to the lead element’s location. Upon reaching the lead element, he treated and stabilized two more Soldiers. Finishing those lifesaving efforts, Staff Sergeant Shurer noticed two additional severely wounded Soldiers under intense enemy fire. The bullet that had wounded one of these Soldiers had also impacted Staff Sergeant Shurer’s helmet. With complete disregard for his own life, Staff Sergeant Shurer again moved through enemy fire to treat and stabilize one Soldier’s severely wounded arm. Shortly thereafter, Staff Sergeant Shurer continued to brave withering enemy fire to get to the other Soldier’s location in order to treat his lower leg, which had been almost completely severed by a high-caliber sniper round. After treating the Soldier, Staff Sergeant Shurer began to evacuate the wounded; carrying and lowering them down the sheer mountainside. While moving down the mountain, Staff Sergeant Shurer used his own body to shield the wounded from enemy fire and debris caused by danger-close air strikes. Reaching the base of the mountain, Staff Sergeant Shurer set up a casualty collection point and continued to treat the wounded. With the arrival of the medical evacuation helicopter, Staff Sergeant Shurer, again under enemy fire, helped load the wounded into the helicopter. Having ensured the safety of the wounded, Staff Sergeant Shurer then regained control of his commando squad and rejoined the fight. He continued to lead his troops and emplace security elements until it was time to move to the evacuation landing zone for the helicopter. Staff Sergeant Shurer’s actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force-Afghanistan, Special Operations Command Central, and the United States Army.


RIP Staff Sergeant.  Gone way too soon....

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News from the World of Military and Veterans Issues. Iraq and A-Stan in parenthesis reflects that the author is currently deployed to that theater.