Survey not good news for veterans

 
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Survey not good news for veterans

This is fairly scary:

The general public vastly overestimates the number of post-9/11 veterans with mental health conditions, a misconception veterans advocates say threatens the overall well-being and employment prospects of former troops.

A survey of more than 1,000 adults in the U.S., Canada and the United Kingdom found that roughly 40 percent believed more than half the 2.8 million veterans who have served since 2001 have a mental health condition.

The actual figure lies somewhere between 10 percent and 20 percent, or 280,000 to just more than a half million, according to a Rand Corp. estimate.

There's nothing wrong with needing help or seeking help, but when nearly half the American populace believes that 1/2 of us have a mental health issue, it's not a good thing.  It's just a different form of prejudice, and it won't help our unemployment figures at all.

Let's hope we can dispense with that stigma.  It wasn't true back in the day of Rambo movies that portrayed veterans as maladjusted, and it isn't true now.  But sometimes perceptions can be as dangerous as realities.

 

 

Posted in the burner | 3 comments
 
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The issues facing troops returning from a conflict are the same issues children living in a neighborhood that is filled with violence here in the U.S. face. My belief is the lack of open dialog within our instant media society is very near to the core of the problem. Those who do not experience the action first hand, have not the necessary imagination to feel the emotional change that results when faced real-time with that life changing event of violence. Answering the call to open dialog within our "space/time continuum" life style might necessitate a return to gathering around the "freedom tree" of a near forgotten era.

I honestly believe the media shares plenty of blame. The current generation of veterans are portrayed the same those who fought in Vietnam were. I can remember having a conversation with an Afghan vet. I shared this experience with other people and some asked if he was OK. I said yes, and asked why wouldn't be? There was no response, but it shows the impact of the stereotyping of our current generation of veterans.

I honestly believe the media shares plenty of blame. The current generation of veterans are portrayed the same those who fought in Vietnam were. I can remember having a conversation with an Afghan vet. I shared this experience with other people and some asked if he was OK. I said yes, and asked why wouldn't be? There was no response, but it shows the impact of the stereotyping of our current generation of veterans.

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News from the World of Military and Veterans Issues. Iraq and A-Stan in parenthesis reflects that the author is currently deployed to that theater.